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It’s time for me to bid farewell

Posted on September 15, 2009. Filed under: bidding farewell, bloggers, blogging, blogs, farewell, friends, goodbye, life, random, saying goodbye, thoughts, Uncategorized, WordPress | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Fortunately or unfortunately, this is going to be my last post on this blog 😐

I know it isn’t fair to have a blog and allow it to decay without posting for a long time. But, I’m not able to spend enough time updating blogs, so I’ll have to let some go. Sadly, this one gets the axe. I’m not going to delete it and anyone can make free use of whatever is present here. There will be no more posts on this blog 😐

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With a heavy heart, it’s time to bid adios. Thanks a lot, my dear friends! 🙂 I really enjoyed each one of your thoughtful comments! I value our friendship and will keep in touch with you by different means. Thank you, WordPress, for the amazing blogging platform you’ve created! Wish you all good luck, great health, prosperity and eternal happiness!

Adieu, mes amis! 🙂

goodbye-748987

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A beautiful Moon ring

Posted on September 15, 2008. Filed under: astronomy, atmosphere, atmospheric effects, Earth, geography, ice crystals, knowledge, light, Moon, Moon halo, Moon rings, moonbow, moonlight, natural phenomenon, nature, rainbow, refraction, ring around the Moon, science, sky, stargazing, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Three nights ago, when I casually looked out of the window at the sky, I could not help exclaiming, “Wow!” It was a partly clear sky and the Moon was in its Waxing Gibbous phase. But I could observe a brilliant ring around the Moon. It formed a complete circle around the Earth’s natural satellite. On observing it carefully, I noticed that the ring was actually made of multiple colours, like a rainbow, though the seven colours were not clearly distinguishable. Sometimes it is also referred to as a moonbow. Many others in my city seem to have noticed this beautiful phenomenon as well.

A brilliant Moon ring . . .

Image: http://flickr.com/photos/spiralstares
Photographer: Spiralstares (taken with a Canon PowerShot S200 on January 19, 2005)

Since it was the first time I was observing such a ring, I searched for information about Moon rings and this is what I found:

The ring around the Moon is caused by the refraction of moonlight (which of course is reflected sunlight) from ice crystals in the upper atmosphere. The shape of the ice crystals results in a focusing of the light into a ring. Since the ice crystals typically have the same shape, namely a hexagonal shape, the Moon ring is almost always the same size. The six-sided ice crystals refract, or bend, light in the same manner that a camera lens bends light. The ring has a diameter of 22° , and sometimes, if one is lucky, it is also possible to detect a second ring with a diameter of 44°. Thin high cirrus clouds lofting at 20,000 feet or more contain tiny ice crystals that originate from the freezing of super cooled water droplets. These crystals behave like jewels refracting and reflecting in different directions.

There are some interesting beliefs about Moon rings. Folklore has it that a ring around the Moon signifies that bad weather is coming, and in many cases this may be true. So how can rings around the Moon be a predictor of weather to come? The ice crystals that cover the halo signify high altitude, thin cirrus clouds that normally precede a warm front by one or two days. Typically, a warm front will be associated with a low pressure system which is commonly referred to as a storm. Some even believe that the number of stars within a Moon ring indicate the number days before bad weather will arrive. Read more about Moon rings and other moonlight effects on this site.

Have you ever observed this natural phenomenon?


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This cute bird belongs to a new species!

Posted on August 17, 2008. Filed under: Africa, animals, biology, bird watching, birds, Earth, Earthlings, fauna, Gabon, knowledge, nature, new species, news, olive-backed forest robin, ornithology, science, Stiphrornis pyrrholaemus, taxonomy, Uncategorized, zoology | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

A new bird species has been discovered in the forests of Gabon in Africa. Read this article from the Science Daily for more information about the discovery.

The olive-backed forest robin (Stiphrornis pyrrholaemus) . . .


Image: Science Daily

The bird has been named as the olive-backed forest robin for its distinctive olive back and rump. The average adult is about 11.5 centimetres long and weighs about 18 grams. The birds have a white dot in front of each eye. The male has a bright orange throat and breast, a yellow belly and a black head. The female has the same colours but appears dull when compared to the male.

Though the bird was first observed by scientists from the Smithsonian Institution in 2001 in the south-western part of Gabon, it has been officially recognised as a new species only now after scientists collected more specimens and compared their DNA to those of the other known forest robins.

While we keep hearing of species becoming extinct or getting endangered at an alarming rate, this discovery would definitely bring cheer to the hearts of ornithologists and other nature lovers!

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